Movie Review: Maleficent

I had the luck of viewing maleficent at the sixth of June, when my sister had come over to visit. And while I know it’s a bit late and behind in the times, I thought this movie would deserve a proper review :)

I’ll admit, I wasn’t completely overjoyed when I heard that it was going to be a story on how Maleficent was taken wrongly despite being a very nice person. I’d expected a more… to be perfectly honest, a more villain-esque backstory, about how she became evil, not how she became to be perceived as evil. However, despite being initially put down by the setting, I was able to enjoy the movie a lot, thanks to the extremely smart portrayal of emotions, character development, and various themes, albeit with a bit hackneyed plot.

The plot was…. well, I won’t spoil and I’ll try to be unbiased, but it couldn’t be denied that it was indeed a little bit obvious as to where it was going. (My sister and I were literally grabbing each other in expectant panic when the climax of the movie arrived, both of us wishing that it wasn’t going where we thought it was going) Flipping the original notions of good and evil on the character development stage did bring about a pleasant twist in the viewer’s point of view, though. Because in the original Disney animation, we didn’t exactly get a story as to what exactly had happened. Strictly speaking, it would have been unnecessary in the original animation because that movie had been a direct adaptation of an age-old fairy tale, (albeit not so direct as to make it family-friendly) but the characterization in Maleficent, giving an explanation that goes against what we would normally expect, I thought this, again, told us that we shouldn’t take things at face value. If I were to read a bit more into it, I would say that this was also an attempt to break stereotypes.

We grow up – or at least grew up, since I don’t know how parenting has changed in the sixteen-and-a-half years since I was born – reading fairy tales, most of which are very similar to each other. Usually, there will be a castle, and royalty. Occasionally, there will be a brave commonfolk who manages to fight and achieve his way into the realms of the royals, who marries the princess and lives happily ever after. Now, the feminism in this movie is already brought into the spotlight, told as following up the notion of ‘I’m no damsel in distress, waiting for a prince to save me’.(But I’ll admit, feminism-wise, the part that I liked the most wasn’t the ‘I don’t need a man’ attitude, not because it’s not true but rather because I thought it was being portrayed in a rather, much like the plot, hackneyed and over-exaggerated way. That particular viewpoint was better represented in Frozen, in my humble, individual opinion.) However, this movie also rebukes the old notion that the princes and princesses are all good people. Of course, I do observe an increase in stories that start along the lines of: Once upon a time, there was a wicked king, whose kingdom lived in fear of his wrath….and so on. But the fact that the ‘Wicked witch’ is the protagonist, the ‘fairies’ actually incompetent fools, and the ‘royalty’ the antagonistic entity, we are brought to another shift in perspective, that just because it’s a fairy tale doesn’t mean that we have to try to fit ourselves into a certain frame of observance.

The reason why I’d wanted the villain-esque story to be represented was because of the fact that hatred and maliciousness were perfectly human emotions that everyone is capable of having, but at the same time one that is carelessly cast aside. I didn’t want this story to be about a misunderstanding – I wanted Maleficent to be driven by hatred, something that cannot be considered as a misinterpretation of ‘good intentions’. Because sometimes, we in the real world are motivated by hate. We make mistakes, we feel malicious, vicious emotions towards other people, and we don’t feel guilty about feeling that, about feeling ‘human’. I wanted Maleficent to be unapologetic, to be motivated by the vicious emotions that sometimes hit the best of our kind, no matter how nice someone is. And as for that category, I think this movie fulfilled exactly what I had wanted to see.

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2 thoughts on “Movie Review: Maleficent

  1. The movie was beautifully made, but I agree with a lot of what you said. I wanted Maleficent to, even if she was going to be redeemed, make a mistake that she couldn’t fix. She was able to “fix” all of her mistakes in the movie and basically get a do-over. Life really doesn’t work that way, and it did make her a lot more wishy-washy in perspective.

    • Exactly – I understand that the movie had to have a happy ending with the core audience being innocent, wide-eyed children, but I wish they’d showed Maleficent rising over everything she’d lost and finding happiness once again, especially with what the central conflict(?) seemed to symbolize.

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